Beautiful People and Places of Zanzibar and Tanganyika: Photos from 1936

Compiled by Malik Merchant

(Photographs and captions for this piece are from the Matson (G. Eric and Edith) Photograph Collection at the Library of Congress, USA. Introductory material on mainland Tanzania – then known as Tanganyika – and Zanzibar was compiled from Wikipedia)

Zanzibar

Zanzibar is composed of the Zanzibar Archipelago in the Indian Ocean, 25–50 kilometres (16–31 mi) off the coast of the mainland Tanzania, and consists of numerous small islands. The main island is informally referred to Zanzibar.

The islands gained independence from Great Britain on 10 December 1963 as a constitutional monarchy.

A month later, the bloody Zanzibar Revolution, in which hundreds to thousands of Arabs and Indians were killed in a genocide and thousands more expelled, led to the establishment of the People’s Republic of Zanzibar and Pemba. In April 1964, the republic merged with mainland Tanganyika. This United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar was soon renamed (as a portmanteau) the United Republic of Tanzania, of which Zanzibar remains a semi-autonomous region.


En route to Zanzibar. Air view. East coast of Kenya. Palm grove along the beach

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En route to Zanzibar. Air view. Tanga.

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Zanzibar. Air view looking down on central part of city

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Zanzibar. Air view. The town with H.M.S. “Pegasus” of war fame, seen in distance

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Zanzibar. The residency

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Zanzibar. Native huts among the palms

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Zanzibar. Sultan’s palace on the sea front

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Zanzibar. Looking down on town from roof of ancient Arab palace; Catholic church in distance

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Zanzibar. Garden of pineapples

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Zanzibar. Pile of coconuts in a grove

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Zanzibar. Banana stand in the fruit market.

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Zanzibar. Sunset through grove of royal palms

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Zanzibar. Natives treading mud for making bricks

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Zanzibar. Narrow street in the town

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Zanzibar. Elegantly carved Arab doorway, in former Sultan’s palace

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Zanzibar. Close up of Portugese fort

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Zanzibar. Ancient Portugese building, used as a museum

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Zanzibar. Street scene and the commonly used ricksha

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Zanzibar. The Livingstone house showing street entrance

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Zanzibar. Bags of cloves for exportation

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Tanganyika (now Tanzania)

Tanganyika gained independence from the United Kingdom as a Commonwealth Realm on 9 December 1961, becoming a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations exactly a year later on 9 December 1962. On 26 April 1964, Tanganyika joined with the islands of Zanzibar to form the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar, a new state that changed its name to the United Republic of Tanzania within a year.


Dar-es-Salaam. Air view. The sea front

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Dar-es-Salaam. Air view. Closer view of sea front

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Dar-es-Salaam. The new Africa Hotel

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Dar-es-Salaam. The Protestant church

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Dar-es-Salaam. War monument in town square

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Dar-es-Salaam. Large baobab tree on grounds of the residency

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Dar-es-Salaam. Youths in a native market

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Dar-es-Salaam. The coconut market

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Dar-es-Salaam. Native women with cicatrice patterns on their faces and buttons inserted in upper lips

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Dar-es-Salaam. Native woman. Close up. Patterned face and extended upper lip

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Dar-es-Salaam. Sunrise seen through palm grove from across the bay

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Dar-es-Salaam. The railroad club grounds and buildings

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En route to Arusha. A Sunday ‘party. Natives, near Mount Meru

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Arusha. Masai warriors with their gleaming spears at a wedding

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Arusha. Masai warriors with their gleaming spears at a wedding.
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En route to Longido. Country scene near Longido

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En route to Longido. A girl with large ear decorations and quantities of neck rings, with arms covered with cloak

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Ngorongoro Crater. The Ulyate Camping Ground on crater’s edge, glimpse of crater on left

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Ngorongoro Crater. Wooded scene along crater’s edge

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Ngorongoro Crater. Road leading down to the plains in the crater

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Ngorongoro Crater. Stampede of wildebeest in crater

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Ngorongoro Crater. Zebra with crater wall in background

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En route to Arusha. Air view. Mount Kilimanjaro as seen from plane

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En route to Arusha. Snow capped Kilimanjaro from landing ground near Moshi. Plane in foreground

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En route to Arusha. “Oldonyo Samba” Mount Meru from the west

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Arusha. The Arusha Hotel

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Arusha Hotel. Brilliant climbing plant covering porch

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Arusha Hotel. Swimming pool in the midst of luxuriant vegetation

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Arusha. Wedding dance. Masai tribe

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Arusha. Masai warriors on their way to the wedding

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Arusha. Warusha women with trinkets and ornaments. Close up

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Arusha. Masai men wearing peculiar wigs

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Arusha. A yound Masai interested in the camera

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En route to Longido. A woman with her children

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En route to Longido. Typical native straw hut

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En route to Longido. Elephant skull at the rancher’s homestead

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En route to Longido. Flock of countless storks

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En route to Longido. Stork alighting on tree top

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Stork on the wing

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En route to Longido. Woman with spiral decorations on arms and legs

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En route to Longido. Close up of leg spirals

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Rift Valley. Soda lakes in bed of the Rift Valley

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Ngorongoro Crater. Sign board on crater’s edge indicating a complete game reserve

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Ngorongoro Crater. Looking across the crater. Twelve miles diameter

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Arusha. Half-way point from Cape to Cairo

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Rift Valley and en route to Nairobi. Scene along the highway

Date posted: Saturday, November 3, 2012

We encourage all our readers, their families as well as friends to visit the website of the US Library of Congress by clicking on www.loc.govand discover its riches.

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